Alicia McCarthy | Untitled (5), 2014. Crayon, spray paint and latex paint on found wood. 4' x 4'. Image courtesy of Johansson Projects and the artist

Outside/Inside: Alicia Mccarthy and Jenny Sharaf at Johansson Projects

The current show at Johansson Projects, Alicia Mccarthy + Jenny Sharaf, is a bit of a study in contrasts. For one, the artists find themselves at different points along their respective career paths. Alicia Mccarthy is a mainstay in the

Alicia McCarthy | Untitled (5), 2014. Crayon, spray paint and latex paint on found wood. 4' x 4'. Image courtesy of Johansson Projects and the artist

Outside/Inside: Alicia Mccarthy and Jenny Sharaf at Johansson Projects

The current show at Johansson Projects, Alicia Mccarthy + Jenny Sharaf, is a bit of a study in contrasts. For one, the artists find themselves at different points along their respective career paths. Alicia Mccarthy is a mainstay in the

Jason Jägel | Intending to Grasp the Netter, 2013. Oil on linen on board. 48” x 40”. Courtesy of the artist and Gallery 16

Mission Schooled: Jason Jägel at Gallery 16

If you’re a fan of underground hip hop then you’ve probably seen Jason Jägel’s (NAP #25) work. He’s produced album cover art for the likes of Dudley Perkins, Madlib, and MF Doom, including the cover of the 2011 reissue of Operation:

Jason Jägel | Intending to Grasp the Netter, 2013. Oil on linen on board. 48” x 40”. Courtesy of the artist and Gallery 16

Mission Schooled: Jason Jägel at Gallery 16

If you’re a fan of underground hip hop then you’ve probably seen Jason Jägel’s (NAP #25) work. He’s produced album cover art for the likes of Dudley Perkins, Madlib, and MF Doom, including the cover of the 2011 reissue of Operation:

Mitzi Pederson, Untitled, 2014, Tulle, ink, 35 x 31 inches. Courtesy of Ratio 3

Material Concerns: Q&A with Mitzi Pederson

To say that JPEG images don’t do justice to Mitzi Pederson’s work at Ratio 3 (3:43, open until tomorrow) is a bit of an understatement. Her exploration of materials finds her once again working with tulle, a fine netting that

Mitzi Pederson, Untitled, 2014, Tulle, ink, 35 x 31 inches. Courtesy of Ratio 3

Material Concerns: Q&A with Mitzi Pederson

To say that JPEG images don’t do justice to Mitzi Pederson’s work at Ratio 3 (3:43, open until tomorrow) is a bit of an understatement. Her exploration of materials finds her once again working with tulle, a fine netting that

Installation view of Laura Judkis’ work in Group Show (2013) at sophiajacob in Baltimore

The Relativity of Black: Q&A with Laura Judkis

Laura Judkis doesn’t make black paintings. Sometimes she doesn’t even use black in her compositions at all. Her work is pushed by the dark theatrical narratives that are associated with the color black, and even though she often works with other

Installation view of Laura Judkis’ work in Group Show (2013) at sophiajacob in Baltimore

The Relativity of Black: Q&A with Laura Judkis

Laura Judkis doesn’t make black paintings. Sometimes she doesn’t even use black in her compositions at all. Her work is pushed by the dark theatrical narratives that are associated with the color black, and even though she often works with other

Sean Talley | AIILCI, 2013. Graphite powder on paper. 14 x 11 inches

The Relativity of Black: Q&A with Sean Talley

Long time critic David Levi Strauss proposes that art criticism “involves making finer and finer distinctions among like things.” Sean Talley’s most recent body of work makes a similar kind of assertion with regard to color. For every black surface

Sean Talley | AIILCI, 2013. Graphite powder on paper. 14 x 11 inches

The Relativity of Black: Q&A with Sean Talley

Long time critic David Levi Strauss proposes that art criticism “involves making finer and finer distinctions among like things.” Sean Talley’s most recent body of work makes a similar kind of assertion with regard to color. For every black surface

“The Temptation to Exist 002” 2013. Acrylic on Canvas with Wooden Shelf. 66 x 5 x 7 inches

The Relativity of Black: Q&A with Vincent Como

We’re all familiar with Spinal Tap’s ruminations on the color black. In this memorable scene of the mockumentary This is Spinal Tap, the band gathers around their manager as he reveals the jacket cover for their new album, Smell the

“The Temptation to Exist 002” 2013. Acrylic on Canvas with Wooden Shelf. 66 x 5 x 7 inches

The Relativity of Black: Q&A with Vincent Como

We’re all familiar with Spinal Tap’s ruminations on the color black. In this memorable scene of the mockumentary This is Spinal Tap, the band gathers around their manager as he reveals the jacket cover for their new album, Smell the

Patrick McDonough | 120210-lawn chair, Wood, Paint, Outdoor Furniture Fabric, Hardware; 76″ by 27″ by 27″

Painting as Shorthand: the lawn chair sculptures of Patrick McDonough

Patrick McDonough’s lawn chairs are not meant for sitting. And if they begin to seem functional, well, it’s all pretend. The sculptures offer the formal concepts of lawn chairs without actually closing the deal — legs and armrests have gone

Patrick McDonough | 120210-lawn chair, Wood, Paint, Outdoor Furniture Fabric, Hardware; 76″ by 27″ by 27″

Painting as Shorthand: the lawn chair sculptures of Patrick McDonough

Patrick McDonough’s lawn chairs are not meant for sitting. And if they begin to seem functional, well, it’s all pretend. The sculptures offer the formal concepts of lawn chairs without actually closing the deal — legs and armrests have gone

"The Awakening" | Kathryn Cornelius | video, 9:52 minutes | courtesy of Curator's Office

Kathryn Cornelius: Let’s Not Ever Be Strangers Again

Maybe one day, Kathryn Cornelius will meet her future spouse. She might fall deeply in love and tie the knot. And it will be for the first time, even if she’s played the bride on seven occasions before. Last summer

"The Awakening" | Kathryn Cornelius | video, 9:52 minutes | courtesy of Curator's Office

Kathryn Cornelius: Let’s Not Ever Be Strangers Again

Maybe one day, Kathryn Cornelius will meet her future spouse. She might fall deeply in love and tie the knot. And it will be for the first time, even if she’s played the bride on seven occasions before. Last summer

Alex Da Corte. "Big Brothers" | Foam, Fringe, Bleach, Andrew Gbur’s “Untitled”, Ratchet Strap, Sean Fitzgerald’s “16 Colors”, Leggings, Plastic Grapes, Broken Christmas Ornament | 2013

Dead Zone: Alex Da Corte at Nudashank

Technically speaking, Dead Zone (at Nudashank through March 17) is a group show curated by Philly-based artist Alex Da Corte. But this description isn’t really accurate. Rather than playing the role of curator, Da Corte is bringing in works by

Alex Da Corte. "Big Brothers" | Foam, Fringe, Bleach, Andrew Gbur’s “Untitled”, Ratchet Strap, Sean Fitzgerald’s “16 Colors”, Leggings, Plastic Grapes, Broken Christmas Ornament | 2013

Dead Zone: Alex Da Corte at Nudashank

Technically speaking, Dead Zone (at Nudashank through March 17) is a group show curated by Philly-based artist Alex Da Corte. But this description isn’t really accurate. Rather than playing the role of curator, Da Corte is bringing in works by

Andrei Molodkin

Andrei Molodkin: Crude

It can be a bothersome pairing, art and politics. Politics strives for deliverables and metrics; art may provide neither. If we are to consider the contemporary art world and not, say, the art of the Occupy move­ment, then the relationship

Andrei Molodkin

Andrei Molodkin: Crude

It can be a bothersome pairing, art and politics. Politics strives for deliverables and metrics; art may provide neither. If we are to consider the contemporary art world and not, say, the art of the Occupy move­ment, then the relationship

Felipe Pereira Goncalves  | space…the unfuckable frontier, 2011, acrylic and spray paints,glue, and glitter on canvas, 32″x 50″

The Unfuckable Frontier

The limits of the human mind have something to do with really big numbers. There’s no insight into knowing that Earth is one hundred million miles away from the Sun, for example — it’s just real far. Partly, it’s a matter

Felipe Pereira Goncalves  | space…the unfuckable frontier, 2011, acrylic and spray paints,glue, and glitter on canvas, 32″x 50″

The Unfuckable Frontier

The limits of the human mind have something to do with really big numbers. There’s no insight into knowing that Earth is one hundred million miles away from the Sun, for example — it’s just real far. Partly, it’s a matter

Laura Hudson | Installation view of Art Opening | 2012, image courtesy of the artist

Social Practice: A Q&A with Laura Hudson

Laura Hudson has been getting out of the studio. The Baltimore-based painter organizes participatory events, documents them on video, then culls her compositions from the nuanced moments hidden in the hours of footage. For her latest project Laura organized a sleepover

Laura Hudson | Installation view of Art Opening | 2012, image courtesy of the artist

Social Practice: A Q&A with Laura Hudson

Laura Hudson has been getting out of the studio. The Baltimore-based painter organizes participatory events, documents them on video, then culls her compositions from the nuanced moments hidden in the hours of footage. For her latest project Laura organized a sleepover

Judy Rushin | Installation view of Modular series. Image courtesy of the artist.

Modular Abstraction: A Q&A with Judy Rushin

Practical necessity is Judy Rushin’s muse. Well, not exactly. Her Modular series of sculptural paintings are made to be disassembled and reconfigured again; site-specific works that can travel well. Individual modules are aggregated into compositions for new exhibition layouts, then stacked

Judy Rushin | Installation view of Modular series. Image courtesy of the artist.

Modular Abstraction: A Q&A with Judy Rushin

Practical necessity is Judy Rushin’s muse. Well, not exactly. Her Modular series of sculptural paintings are made to be disassembled and reconfigured again; site-specific works that can travel well. Individual modules are aggregated into compositions for new exhibition layouts, then stacked

Chajana denHarder performing Singularity (Artist Platform). Photo by Tony Wilson

Emerging Again: D.C.’s (e)merge goes into its second year

Last year’s preview night at (e)merge was a big, ruckus party. Amidst the large crowds it was often difficult to navigate the hallways between exhibitors, and the wait for the elevators always seemed impossibly long. While it may have been loads of

Chajana denHarder performing Singularity (Artist Platform). Photo by Tony Wilson

Emerging Again: D.C.’s (e)merge goes into its second year

Last year’s preview night at (e)merge was a big, ruckus party. Amidst the large crowds it was often difficult to navigate the hallways between exhibitors, and the wait for the elevators always seemed impossibly long. While it may have been loads of

LISA RUYTER | Arthur Rothstein “Dry and parched earth in the badlands of South Dakota” | 2009, acrylic on canvas, 47 x 59 inches. Image courtesy of Connersmith

Chromatic Archive: Lisa Ruyter at Connersmith

There’s a seemingly direct line between Lisa Ruyter’s work and pop art. Like pop art, Ruyter’s paintings are guided by photography and mass media, her appropriation strategies a central crux of her compositions. But her artistic concerns are decidedly unwarholian. Rather than

LISA RUYTER | Arthur Rothstein “Dry and parched earth in the badlands of South Dakota” | 2009, acrylic on canvas, 47 x 59 inches. Image courtesy of Connersmith

Chromatic Archive: Lisa Ruyter at Connersmith

There’s a seemingly direct line between Lisa Ruyter’s work and pop art. Like pop art, Ruyter’s paintings are guided by photography and mass media, her appropriation strategies a central crux of her compositions. But her artistic concerns are decidedly unwarholian. Rather than

Brian Chippendale | The High Castle | 2011, screenprint collage on wood, 58”x48” (image courtesy of the artist and Arlington Arts Center)

From Print to Painting to Print: CTRL+P at Arlington Arts Center

Brian Chippendale came to prominence as a leading figure in the underground art and music scene that blossomed in Providence, RI during the 1990s. At the center of this creative explosion was Fort Thunder, an expansive live-work space co-founded by Chippendale

Brian Chippendale | The High Castle | 2011, screenprint collage on wood, 58”x48” (image courtesy of the artist and Arlington Arts Center)

From Print to Painting to Print: CTRL+P at Arlington Arts Center

Brian Chippendale came to prominence as a leading figure in the underground art and music scene that blossomed in Providence, RI during the 1990s. At the center of this creative explosion was Fort Thunder, an expansive live-work space co-founded by Chippendale

Ryan Carr Johnson and Samuel Dylan Scharf | Kline A.D. 2012. Paint on Plywood with bullet holes. 25" x 37" x 2.5"

Guns, Art, and a Project by Ryan Carr Johnson and Samuel Dylan Scharf

There’s a long history of guns in contemporary art, from Chris Burden’s Shoot to Sophie Calle’s ballistic treatment of her lover’s letter in Take Care of Yourself to a myriad points in between. And the connection between guns and painting

Ryan Carr Johnson and Samuel Dylan Scharf | Kline A.D. 2012. Paint on Plywood with bullet holes. 25" x 37" x 2.5"

Guns, Art, and a Project by Ryan Carr Johnson and Samuel Dylan Scharf

There’s a long history of guns in contemporary art, from Chris Burden’s Shoot to Sophie Calle’s ballistic treatment of her lover’s letter in Take Care of Yourself to a myriad points in between. And the connection between guns and painting

Installation view of Jack Henry and David Ostrowski at Nudashank

David Ostrowski and Jack Henry at Nudashank

This article was originally published in the New American Paintings blog in June of this year. This exhibition closed on July 8.

Installation view of Jack Henry and David Ostrowski at Nudashank

David Ostrowski and Jack Henry at Nudashank

This article was originally published in the New American Paintings blog in June of this year. This exhibition closed on July 8.

Hedieh Javanshir Ilchi | “I’m Coming Home”, 2012. Acrylic, gouache and handpainted collage on Mylar. 54 x 42 inches

Contemporary Wing Opens in D.C.

I catch up with Lauren Gentile, founder and director of newly opened D.C. gallery Contemporary Wing, to talk about her new exhibition space, her previous project “Next Generation,” and her inaugural show featuring the work of Hedieh Javanshir Ilchi.

Hedieh Javanshir Ilchi | “I’m Coming Home”, 2012. Acrylic, gouache and handpainted collage on Mylar. 54 x 42 inches

Contemporary Wing Opens in D.C.

I catch up with Lauren Gentile, founder and director of newly opened D.C. gallery Contemporary Wing, to talk about her new exhibition space, her previous project “Next Generation,” and her inaugural show featuring the work of Hedieh Javanshir Ilchi.

Gongasriikan mercenaries in the employ of the Frenglish Republic, 2012, Ink, acrylic, coffee, tea on paper, 43 1⁄2 x 30 1⁄4 inches (courtesy Heiner Contemporary and the artist)

Rehashing History: Frohawk Two Feathers at Heiner Contemporary

The work of Frohawk Two Feathers, pseudonym of Chicago-born and L.A.-based artist Umar Rashid, is steeped in folklore. For the better part of ten years the artist has visually explored narratives of colonialism through paintings and exhibitions that cumulatively function like chapters in an epic fantasy. I checked out his current show, “Every Winter Was A War,” She Said, at Heiner Contemporary.

Gongasriikan mercenaries in the employ of the Frenglish Republic, 2012, Ink, acrylic, coffee, tea on paper, 43 1⁄2 x 30 1⁄4 inches (courtesy Heiner Contemporary and the artist)

Rehashing History: Frohawk Two Feathers at Heiner Contemporary

The work of Frohawk Two Feathers, pseudonym of Chicago-born and L.A.-based artist Umar Rashid, is steeped in folklore. For the better part of ten years the artist has visually explored narratives of colonialism through paintings and exhibitions that cumulatively function like chapters in an epic fantasy. I checked out his current show, “Every Winter Was A War,” She Said, at Heiner Contemporary.

The Baltimore Contemporary Print Fair 2012, all photos by Matthew Smith

The Baltimore Contemporary Print Fair at BMA

Last weekend the Baltimore Museum of Art hosted its bi-annual print fair, bringing together a group of exciting printmakers for a small two-day event that featured an artist talk by Trenton Doyle Hancock. My thoughts on the fair, and lots of photos of the most exciting work, after the jump.

The Baltimore Contemporary Print Fair 2012, all photos by Matthew Smith

The Baltimore Contemporary Print Fair at BMA

Last weekend the Baltimore Museum of Art hosted its bi-annual print fair, bringing together a group of exciting printmakers for a small two-day event that featured an artist talk by Trenton Doyle Hancock. My thoughts on the fair, and lots of photos of the most exciting work, after the jump.

Tomokazu Matsuyama | Kirin (Black Stripe), 2009, acrylic on canvas. 48 x 48 in. Courtesy of the artist.

Painted Diplomacy: Tomokazu Matsuyama at AU

“Thousand Regards,” Japanese-American artist Tomokazu Matsuyama’s solo exhibition at American University (through May 20), is timed to coincide with the Cherry Blossom Festival but it’s miles away from the Mall.

Tomokazu Matsuyama | Kirin (Black Stripe), 2009, acrylic on canvas. 48 x 48 in. Courtesy of the artist.

Painted Diplomacy: Tomokazu Matsuyama at AU

“Thousand Regards,” Japanese-American artist Tomokazu Matsuyama’s solo exhibition at American University (through May 20), is timed to coincide with the Cherry Blossom Festival but it’s miles away from the Mall.

Tom Green | Of This World 3, 2011 acrylic on paper 29.75” x 22.25”, courtesy Curator’s Office

Of This World: Tom Green at Curator’s Office

This article was originally published in New American Paintings/blog | link “Time is of the essence now.” Most of us will never fully grasp the weight of Tom Green’s words when he spoke to the Washington Post last December. He’d been diagnosed with ALS

Tom Green | Of This World 3, 2011 acrylic on paper 29.75” x 22.25”, courtesy Curator’s Office

Of This World: Tom Green at Curator’s Office

This article was originally published in New American Paintings/blog | link “Time is of the essence now.” Most of us will never fully grasp the weight of Tom Green’s words when he spoke to the Washington Post last December. He’d been diagnosed with ALS

Wilmer Wilson IV. Domestic Exchange (installation view). 2012, Conner Contemporary Art. (© Wilmer Wilson IV, courtesy Conner Contemporary)

Material Politics: Q&A with Wilmer Wilson IV

Wilmer Wilson’s a busy man. On Thursday he’ll be channeling Henry Box Brown in a performance that’s part of the city-wide public art extravaganza called the “Five by Five Project.” He also opened his first solo show at Conner Contemporary two weeks ago, “Domestic Exchange”, which is on view through May 5th. I recently caught up with Wilmer to ask him a few questions about his work at Conner, and about his upcoming performances for the 5×5 Project.

Wilmer Wilson IV. Domestic Exchange (installation view). 2012, Conner Contemporary Art. (© Wilmer Wilson IV, courtesy Conner Contemporary)

Material Politics: Q&A with Wilmer Wilson IV

Wilmer Wilson’s a busy man. On Thursday he’ll be channeling Henry Box Brown in a performance that’s part of the city-wide public art extravaganza called the “Five by Five Project.” He also opened his first solo show at Conner Contemporary two weeks ago, “Domestic Exchange”, which is on view through May 5th. I recently caught up with Wilmer to ask him a few questions about his work at Conner, and about his upcoming performances for the 5×5 Project.

Steven Riddle

Paper Trail: In the studio with Steven Riddle

I recently dropped by Steven Riddle’s studio at Towson University outside of Baltimore, where he’s a second year MFA candidate. You can check out his work space, and our conversation, after the jump.

Steven Riddle

Paper Trail: In the studio with Steven Riddle

I recently dropped by Steven Riddle’s studio at Towson University outside of Baltimore, where he’s a second year MFA candidate. You can check out his work space, and our conversation, after the jump.

Dawn Black | American Gothic, 2011, Ink, gouache, watercolor on paper, 11” x 17” (courtesy Curator’s Office)

Masquerading Fiction: Dawn Black at Curator’s Office

In her second show at Curator’s Office, Dawn Black pulls characters from her ongoing Conceal Project, and offers a nuanced understanding of the power roles and cues that result from masquerade and from our propensity for playing dress up.

Dawn Black | American Gothic, 2011, Ink, gouache, watercolor on paper, 11” x 17” (courtesy Curator’s Office)

Masquerading Fiction: Dawn Black at Curator’s Office

In her second show at Curator’s Office, Dawn Black pulls characters from her ongoing Conceal Project, and offers a nuanced understanding of the power roles and cues that result from masquerade and from our propensity for playing dress up.

Ian Whitmore | The Bells Through the Leaves, 2008-2012, 16" x 16", oil on linen (courtesy G Fine Art)

Another Place and Time: Ian Whitmore at G Fine Art

This article was originally published in the New American Paintings blog | link It wasn’t long ago that Ian Whitmore was selling out multiple shows in Washington, D.C. before his paintings were even hung for opening night. It may have

Ian Whitmore | The Bells Through the Leaves, 2008-2012, 16" x 16", oil on linen (courtesy G Fine Art)

Another Place and Time: Ian Whitmore at G Fine Art

This article was originally published in the New American Paintings blog | link It wasn’t long ago that Ian Whitmore was selling out multiple shows in Washington, D.C. before his paintings were even hung for opening night. It may have

Gina beavers | 6-color palette, acrylic & paintbrush on canvas, 12” x 14”, 2011, (courtesy Nudashank and the artist)

Le Sigh: Gina Beavers at Nudashank

There’s no escaping the physicality of Gina Beavers’ paintings. Culled from the unremarkable — quotidian moments and bits of cultural flotsam — her work is grounded by the immediacy of her source material. Despite the occasional abstraction, these representations aren’t

Gina beavers | 6-color palette, acrylic & paintbrush on canvas, 12” x 14”, 2011, (courtesy Nudashank and the artist)

Le Sigh: Gina Beavers at Nudashank

There’s no escaping the physicality of Gina Beavers’ paintings. Culled from the unremarkable — quotidian moments and bits of cultural flotsam — her work is grounded by the immediacy of her source material. Despite the occasional abstraction, these representations aren’t

Edward Gero as Mark Rothko and Patrick Andrews as Ken in the 2011 Goodman Theatre production of Red. Directed by Robert Falls. Photo by Liz Lauren.

Playing Rothko: the Seagram Murals on Arena Stage

This article was originally published in the New American Paintings blog | link If abstract painting is an inward journey seeking truth in the human condition, then perhaps Mark Rothko’s Seagram Murals are heralds for what we’ll find. Commissioned in 1958 for

Edward Gero as Mark Rothko and Patrick Andrews as Ken in the 2011 Goodman Theatre production of Red. Directed by Robert Falls. Photo by Liz Lauren.

Playing Rothko: the Seagram Murals on Arena Stage

This article was originally published in the New American Paintings blog | link If abstract painting is an inward journey seeking truth in the human condition, then perhaps Mark Rothko’s Seagram Murals are heralds for what we’ll find. Commissioned in 1958 for

William Betts | Untitled YYZ 10-30-2010, acrylic on canvas, dimension5: 36″ x 72″

A Mediated Landscape: Q&A with William Betts

This year’s New American Paintings Annual Prize has been awarded to William Betts. If you’re a longtime subscriber to New American Paintings you’re probably familiar with the work of the Houston-based artist. Betts has appeared in editions #60, #72, #84 and most recently as an Editor’s

William Betts | Untitled YYZ 10-30-2010, acrylic on canvas, dimension5: 36″ x 72″

A Mediated Landscape: Q&A with William Betts

This year’s New American Paintings Annual Prize has been awarded to William Betts. If you’re a longtime subscriber to New American Paintings you’re probably familiar with the work of the Houston-based artist. Betts has appeared in editions #60, #72, #84 and most recently as an Editor’s

Andy Warhol | Shadows, 1978-79. Dia Art Foundation. © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. Photo: Cathy Carver.

Collecting Critically: A Q&A with Henry Thaggert

Andy Warhol’s relationship to abstraction is charged. Despite a late-career painterly impulse — which included the Shadows series currently exhibiting at the Hirshhorn — his pictorial language based on representation fundamentally questioned the narrative of post-war painting as defined by Clement Greenberg. And the implications of Pop Art’s

Andy Warhol | Shadows, 1978-79. Dia Art Foundation. © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. Photo: Cathy Carver.

Collecting Critically: A Q&A with Henry Thaggert

Andy Warhol’s relationship to abstraction is charged. Despite a late-career painterly impulse — which included the Shadows series currently exhibiting at the Hirshhorn — his pictorial language based on representation fundamentally questioned the narrative of post-war painting as defined by Clement Greenberg. And the implications of Pop Art’s

Chip Allen | LALC 01, 2011, Oil on Paper, 22 x 26 in, courtesy of the artist and Heiner Contemporary

By Any Means Necessary: Q&A with Chip Allen

Chip Allen’s letting loose. He’s squeegeed, splattered, and gesturally brushed over his geometric abstractions, and by the looks of it action painting’s winning out. His loose, intuitive marks and smudges run interference across seemingly systematic lines, the resulting balance a taut

Chip Allen | LALC 01, 2011, Oil on Paper, 22 x 26 in, courtesy of the artist and Heiner Contemporary

By Any Means Necessary: Q&A with Chip Allen

Chip Allen’s letting loose. He’s squeegeed, splattered, and gesturally brushed over his geometric abstractions, and by the looks of it action painting’s winning out. His loose, intuitive marks and smudges run interference across seemingly systematic lines, the resulting balance a taut

Bochner | Die, 2005, oil and acrylic on canvas, 152.4 x 203.2 cm (60 x 80 in.), Courtesy Peter Freeman Inc., New York, © Mel Bochner 2011

A Colorful Language: Paintings by Mel Bochner at the National Gallery of Art

The Tower Gallery at The National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. is currently exhibiting a collection of Bochner’s recent Thesaurus Paintings and preparatory drawings alongside his early and precursory text-based Portraits (1966-1968). With regard to Bochner’s recent work, NGA curator James Meyer observed of Bochner’s recent paintings, “a kind of American Realism has entered Conceptualism’s back door.”

Bochner | Die, 2005, oil and acrylic on canvas, 152.4 x 203.2 cm (60 x 80 in.), Courtesy Peter Freeman Inc., New York, © Mel Bochner 2011

A Colorful Language: Paintings by Mel Bochner at the National Gallery of Art

The Tower Gallery at The National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. is currently exhibiting a collection of Bochner’s recent Thesaurus Paintings and preparatory drawings alongside his early and precursory text-based Portraits (1966-1968). With regard to Bochner’s recent work, NGA curator James Meyer observed of Bochner’s recent paintings, “a kind of American Realism has entered Conceptualism’s back door.”

Matthew Craven| "life totem I", 2011, ink on Paper with cutouts, 72″ x 48″ courtesy of the artist

Historical Lineage: Q&A with Matthew Craven

Much of Matthew Craven’s meticulous work exists as both colorful abstraction and surreal historical document. His transformation of  images appropriated from history textbooks nudge and reconfigure the original historical narratives. And his modular treatment of familiar forms unexpectedly activates their hidden potential

Matthew Craven| "life totem I", 2011, ink on Paper with cutouts, 72″ x 48″ courtesy of the artist

Historical Lineage: Q&A with Matthew Craven

Much of Matthew Craven’s meticulous work exists as both colorful abstraction and surreal historical document. His transformation of  images appropriated from history textbooks nudge and reconfigure the original historical narratives. And his modular treatment of familiar forms unexpectedly activates their hidden potential

Installation view of "The Working Title", a group show on abstraction curated by Progress Report and exhibited at the Bronx River Arts Center, March 25 through April 29, 2011.

Progress Report: Q&A with Kris Chatterson and Vince Contarino

Give it time and the Internet will mobilize for change in just about any arena. So it’s not surprising that artist-run exhibition spaces — always bastions of change — are increasingly striving for a stronger onlinepresence, sometimes even eschewing fixed brick-and-mortar

Installation view of "The Working Title", a group show on abstraction curated by Progress Report and exhibited at the Bronx River Arts Center, March 25 through April 29, 2011.

Progress Report: Q&A with Kris Chatterson and Vince Contarino

Give it time and the Internet will mobilize for change in just about any arena. So it’s not surprising that artist-run exhibition spaces — always bastions of change — are increasingly striving for a stronger onlinepresence, sometimes even eschewing fixed brick-and-mortar

Modern Living, 2011, Ink and bleach on paper, 19 3/4 x 25 1/2 inches, courtesy of Heiner Contemporary and the artist

The Writing’s on the Wall: Q&A with David Kramer

Considering current events, it may be easy to wonder if David Kramer’s paintings have a slight political bent. Much like the characters in his work, we’ve had to collectively reassess our own aspirations amid the failed promises of the credit and housing bubbles. But

Modern Living, 2011, Ink and bleach on paper, 19 3/4 x 25 1/2 inches, courtesy of Heiner Contemporary and the artist

The Writing’s on the Wall: Q&A with David Kramer

Considering current events, it may be easy to wonder if David Kramer’s paintings have a slight political bent. Much like the characters in his work, we’ve had to collectively reassess our own aspirations amid the failed promises of the credit and housing bubbles. But

DC Cheer!, an artist project led by Kristina Bilonick, greeted artists with encouragement as they arrived. Photo by E. Brady Robinson

Highlights from (e)merge: the Artists Platform

Unlike the gallery platform, two-dimensional works were a bit less common in the artist platform at (e)merge. It’s not surprising — in their call to artists the organizers expressed an interest in site-specific work that engaged with the idiosyncrasies of a hotel setting.

DC Cheer!, an artist project led by Kristina Bilonick, greeted artists with encouragement as they arrived. Photo by E. Brady Robinson

Highlights from (e)merge: the Artists Platform

Unlike the gallery platform, two-dimensional works were a bit less common in the artist platform at (e)merge. It’s not surprising — in their call to artists the organizers expressed an interest in site-specific work that engaged with the idiosyncrasies of a hotel setting.

Bathroom installation by Andy Moon Wilson, at Curator’s Office

Highlights from (e)merge: the Gallery Platform

(e)merge kicked off with a preview and poolside party on Thursday evening. Featuring two platforms, one for galleries and the other for unrepresented artists, the fair occupies the first three floors of the Capitol Skyline Hotel as well as the lower

Bathroom installation by Andy Moon Wilson, at Curator’s Office

Highlights from (e)merge: the Gallery Platform

(e)merge kicked off with a preview and poolside party on Thursday evening. Featuring two platforms, one for galleries and the other for unrepresented artists, the fair occupies the first three floors of the Capitol Skyline Hotel as well as the lower

The Capital Skyline Hotel, site of the (e)merge art fair. Image courtesy of (e)merge.

D.C.’s Fair Share: Q&A with the organizers of (e)merge

The Capital Skyline Hotel, site of the (e)merge art fair. Image courtesy of (e)merge. The (e)merge art fair (September 22 – 25, 2011) — founded and organized by Conner Contemporary Art co-directors Leigh Conner and Jamie Smith, as well as by Helen Allen, founder and former

The Capital Skyline Hotel, site of the (e)merge art fair. Image courtesy of (e)merge.

D.C.’s Fair Share: Q&A with the organizers of (e)merge

The Capital Skyline Hotel, site of the (e)merge art fair. Image courtesy of (e)merge. The (e)merge art fair (September 22 – 25, 2011) — founded and organized by Conner Contemporary Art co-directors Leigh Conner and Jamie Smith, as well as by Helen Allen, founder and former

Danube Series: There is No Rising or Setting Sun (Day), 2011, ink and spray paint on paper, 22″ x 30″   Image Courtesy of G Fine Art

Strokes and Stencils: Maggie Michael at G Fine Art

Gestural abstraction perseveres, and in Washington, D.C. few artists have been as attuned to its provisional potential as Maggie Michael (NAP #94). With There is No Rising or Setting Sun, Michael’s fourth solo show at G Fine Art, the artist has largely left the drips and splatters behind in

Danube Series: There is No Rising or Setting Sun (Day), 2011, ink and spray paint on paper, 22″ x 30″   Image Courtesy of G Fine Art

Strokes and Stencils: Maggie Michael at G Fine Art

Gestural abstraction perseveres, and in Washington, D.C. few artists have been as attuned to its provisional potential as Maggie Michael (NAP #94). With There is No Rising or Setting Sun, Michael’s fourth solo show at G Fine Art, the artist has largely left the drips and splatters behind in